Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Sheldon Leiba’ Category

By Sheldon Leiba

In 2007 the federal government announced that it would introduce a series of graduated corporate tax reductions.  The implementation of these tax reductions would have positive effects for Canadian businesses as it would keep Canada competitive on the global stage with its trading partners, many of whom have reduced corporate and payroll taxes in recent years, even through the recent recession.

With Canada slowly emerging from the global recession, businesses worry as political leaders look for ways to balance its books, and one suggestion being debated is scraping the planned corporate income tax cuts.

While some may see this as an appropriate strategy, businesses and jobs would be negatively affected.

Businesses are facing unprecedented challenges today, with the domestic and global economy having slowed down, and competition increasing, not to speak of the myriad of ever-changing red tape and regulations businesses have to comply and contend with on a day-to-day basis.

Many businesses have structured their company financials factoring in the previously-announced tax reductions, meaning that  businesses in Canada would be forced to pay billions of dollars in taxes that they had not anticipated if the government suddenly changes its plan.  This would hamper investments in equipment and jobs – jobs that you, our family and friends have, that are important to our economy and ultimately to our quality of life.  The federal government will in return be impacted by lower tax revenues that would have been generated by this needed business spending and related income taxes.

Aside from paying unexpected taxes, eliminating corporate tax reductions would decrease Canada’s global competitiveness at a time when we are already falling behind in productivity. With Canada’s trading partners already driving down taxes to reduce the burden on their businesses, our federal government should be continuing to find ways to decrease costs to business. Doing so would make Canada a much more attractive place to invest and expand, freeing up capital that will grow Canadian businesses, jobs and our economy.

As government stimulus programs come to an end in 2011, the Mississauga Board of Trade strongly urges our government to make Canada’s economic growth and success a top priority and follow through on its planned corporate tax reductions.

Sheldon Leiba is President & CEO for Mississauga Board of Trade Tel: 905-273-3527; Email sleiba@mbot.com.

The RIC blog is designed as a showcase for entrepreneurs and innovation. Our guest bloggers pro vide a wealth of information based on their personal experiences. Visit RIC Centre for more information on how RIC can accelerate your ideas to market.

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to FurlAdd to Newsvine

Read Full Post »

By Sheldon Leiba

With carbon footprints becoming of greater public concern, environmentally friendly business projects gaining popularity, and countries slashing C02 and greenhouse gas emission levels, turning waste into energy seems like the next logical step in an effort to become a more environmentally conscious country.  Sadly, Canada is missing out on the full value of Energy from Waste technologies and facilities.

Energy from Waste is the processes of recovering energy from the combustion (burning) of waste; this energy can then be fed back into any electricity grid to power homes and businesses.

Aside from being an alternative source of energy, energy from waste can also reduce landfill sites by 90%.  This would be extremely beneficial for Ontario, which is increasingly facing the challenges of finding available landfill space.

Moreover, Energy from Waste facilities are often better for the environment as they reduce  C02 emissions and produce fly ash as a bi-product, which can be used for purposes such as roads bases.  It also reduces the need to be trucking waste to far off locations, including the U.S.

Despite overwhelming support from Canadians for Energy from Waste processing and technologies, Ontario alongside the rest of Canada is lagging behind in adapting this useful technology.

Canada processes only 5% of it its solid waste into energy, at four facilities, including one right here in the Region of Peel, in Brampton, that many residents are unaware of.

With Ontario’s energy costs rising, finding an alternative to conventional power plants, not only means a more cost efficient option, but one which is more environmentally friendly since it eliminates the use of coal, oil and fossil fuels used in current power  plants.

The Regions of Durham and York have recently announced plans to move forward with the building of an Energy from Waste facility. Where in the past the development of Energy from Waste facilities were often a lengthy and burdensome process, the Provincial government has streamlined the approval process to provide more and even small projects to be implemented.

It only makes sense that we solve three critical problems– energy supply, what to do with our garbage, and environment – by maximizing turning our garbage into energy.

Sheldon Leiba is the President & CEO of Mississauga Board of Trade, Mississauga’s leading business association. Mississauga Board of Trade represents businesses in all industry sectors. Visit www.mbot.com.

The RIC blog is designed as a showcase for entrepreneurs and innovation. Our guest bloggers pro vide a wealth of information based on their personal experiences. Visit RIC Centre for more information on how RIC can accelerate your ideas to market.

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to FurlAdd to Newsvine

Read Full Post »

By Sheldon Leiba

Mississauga’s downtown core is taking on Sheridan College’s motto, “shine brighter”, as construction of Sheridan’s third campus is underway just north of the Living Arts Center. Construction of the campus comes after both the Provincial and Federal governments contributed $31 million dollars in funding to Sheridan, with $15 million to be raised through fundraising and other sources, that we hope our corporate sector will generously support.

The new campus will accommodate 1,700 full-time students upon completion of phase 1 next March, and grow to accommodate 5,000 students.   The campus will provide day, night, weekend and continuing education courses, and will have a special concentration on business education and provide a range of services and programming that will help foreign-trained professionals prepare for employment.

Aside from transforming Mississauga’s city center, having Sheridan in the heart of Mississauga will give the city new energy and vibrancy.  Sheridan President, Jeff Zabudsky, has commented that the campus will be a welcoming space for the entire community with the inclusion of park like settings in its design.  Most importantly the campus will serve to solve a greater problem, the skills shortage and workforce issues that Mississauga has now and will continue to have in the future.

In the short term, construction of the new campus has created jobs for those involved in the construction, while in the long term many of the students who attend the Mississauga campus will be able to work for over 50,000 businesses that call Mississauga home. Sheridan’s presence will be essential to Mississauga’s economic development and growth, as it will provide businesses with an enhanced pool of educated and skilled labour.

This is just another good news story that we should all be proud of, that contributes to Mississauga being a great city to live, work,  play, pray and to be educated.

Sheldon Leiba is the President & CEO of Mississauga Board of Trade, Mississauga’s leading business association. Mississauga Board of Trade represents businesses in all industry sectors. Visit www.mbot.com.

The RIC blog is designed as a showcase for entrepreneurs and innovation. Our guest bloggers pro vide a wealth of information based on their personal experiences. Visit RIC Centre for more information on how RIC can accelerate your ideas to market.

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Read Full Post »

By Sheldon Leiba

Education, housing, arts, culture, community services, economy, people, and location are some of the many characteristics that make the City of Mississauga a great community in which to live – but also makes Mississauga a great city for business.

As I meet business people from throughout the province, Canada or from abroad, I am very proud to boast about the many opportunities that our city has to offer to business and its employees.

Business owners and executives, when making decisions on where to locate, often think first about their families.  Top of mind is often education.  Mississauga has an excellent elementary schools system, a diverse range of private schools, at both the elementary and secondary levels, is home to  one of the most prominent and reputable post-secondary institutions in Canada – University of Toronto at Mississauga (UTM), and next year we will be welcoming the opening of a Sheridan College Business School Campus.

Mississauga has a large and excellent mix of housing supply, and an abundance of public amenities and community services, including sports and recreation, arts and culture, and programs serving various family needs and interests.

Our city has a large, growing and diverse economy of more than 55,000 businesses. We also boast a large pool of skilled, qualified and relatively young workers.

Our ethnic diversity adds to social and cultural fabric of the community, and in an increasingly global economy, gives us a competitive advantage.

Location, location, location.  Mississauga’s location within the Greater Toronto Area, Canada’s economic engine, being home to the nation’s largest airport, and access to major 400-series highways, also makes us an ideal place for businesses to be.

With all of these attributes, it is no wonder why Mississauga has developed to become a major economic centre.

Strong political, business and community leadership has and will continue to be instrumental to continuing to build upon our many successes, and your Mississauga Board of Trade is always working to do its part to maintain our city as a magnet for business.

Sheldon Leiba is the President & CEO of Mississauga Board of Trade, Mississauga’s leading business association. Mississauga Board of Trade represents businesses in all industry sectors. Visit www.mbot.com.

The RIC blog is designed as a showcase for entrepreneurs and innovation. Our guest bloggers pro vide a wealth of information based on their personal experiences. Visit RIC Centre for more information on how RIC can accelerate your ideas to market.

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to FurlAdd to Newsvine

Read Full Post »

By Sheldon Leiba

Businesses in Ontario today have a tremendous burden dealing with business regulations and red tape.

Business regulations are intended to serve Ontario citizens by ensuring fair business practices, consumer and public safety, community welfare and care of the natural environment.

While Ontario’s business supports and demonstrates leadership in advancing these objectives, business regulations in Ontario are extensive and unduly heavy, covering every aspect of business.  Included are: government imposed legislation, taxation, regulations, registrations, licenses, permits, approvals, restrictions, standards, guidelines, procedures, reporting,  certification requirements, paperwork, investigations, inspection and enforcement practices, that truly are not needed to the extent that exists to protect public health, safety and the environment.

Dealing with business regulations is a huge cost to business, and in many circumstances the regulation itself, its application, or enforcement, is unnecessary and unjustifiably crude and inflexible.  The result is a strong hindrance on job creation, investment opportunities and weakened competitiveness.  This regulatory environment is extremely detrimental to long-term economic sustainability and growth, and is particularly threatening to business and jobs coming out of a deep economic recession.

In 2008, the Ontario Government announced its “Open for Business” vision to better serve and support business and economic development in the province.

“Open for Business” was intended to be an ambitious three-year initiative, through the Ministry of Economic Development, to reduce the regulatory burden on business while protecting the public interest.

In order for the Provincial Government to be truly serious about its vision for Ontario to be “Open for Business”, the current business regulatory framework that threatens business every day must be shifted significantly, and a stronger commitment is needed at all levels within government, to better support business, economic sustainability, competitiveness and growth.

Sheldon Leiba is the President & CEO of Mississauga Board of Trade, Mississauga’s leading business association. Mississauga Board of Trade represents businesses in all industry sectors. Visit www.mbot.com.

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to FurlAdd to Newsvine

Read Full Post »

By Sheldon Leiba

Ontario has an enviable achievement in having the highest percentage of Post-Secondary Education participation for young adults in the world, with 40% of our 18-24 year olds having attended college or university.

The Ontario job market overwhelmingly favours individuals with a university or college education and this will become even more the case as the economy shifts towards a greater emphasis on highly skilled, knowledge-based jobs, including in  emerging sectors such as green energy and new technology.

Over the past several years, demand for Post-Secondary Education spaces has increased significantly in Ontario.  Projections indicate that demand will continue to grow, particularly in the GTA where more than half of our province’s population aged 15-21 will reside by the year 2021.

It is clear that in order develop a strong pool of talented and skilled labour to support and lead Ontario’s businesses and economy in the future, the province will need to make large on-going investments in Post Secondary Education.

Currently there is a significant funding gap to maintain campus infrastructure and meet operating costs of colleges and universities, and Canada has already fallen far behind many other OECD countries in investment in Post Secondary Education.

Much of Ontario’s college and university infrastructure was built in the 1960s and 1970s, and is in need of major renewal and modernization.  Although in recent years there has been a stronger investment focus on Post Secondary Education, more needs to be done.

Today’s learning and research requires modern, technologically advanced academic infrastructure, particularly to prepare graduates for jobs in the new economy.

An aggressive and long-term funding strategy is needed for colleges and universities in our province, to strengthen Ontario’s ability to compete in the 21st century.

Sheldon Leiba is the President & CEO of Mississauga Board of Trade, Mississauga’s leading business association. Mississauga Board of Trade represents businesses in all industry sectors. Visit www.mbot.com.

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to FurlAdd to Newsvine

Read Full Post »

By Sheldon Leiba

Spring is in the air and the loons are flying high.  No, I’m not speaking of the birds, but our Canadian dollar – the loonie.  Our Canadian dollar is valued at roughly the same as the US dollar.

Certainly, many cross-border shoppers see this as good news, but don’t just jump into your cars yet.

The reason for Canada’s strong dollar is that our economy is largely tied to our rich supply of natural resources – oil, minerals and forestry.

As the world’s demand for these resources rise, particularly from booming economies like China and India, they need more loonies to purchase these commodities, driving up its value.

In addition, Canada’s currency is seen as a safe haven given our strong banking system and our government’s sound financial position, compared to other major countries.

Thus, a high dollar is a sign of the strength of our economy.

Canadian companies that buy supplies or machinery from the US benefit from the rise in the dollar because it improves their buying power.

Similarly, our stronger dollar makes imports more affordable, reducing the costs for consumers on much of what we purchase that comes from abroad.

Canadians planning trips to the US, online shoppers, and yes those heading across the border will see their money go further.

On the flip side, companies that export products, particularly our manufacturers, will see their profits shrink every time the dollar rises.  This will impact investments and jobs, unless the losses can be recouped by productivity gains and innovation.

And just as its cheaper for us to travel south, its more expensive for tourists to come to Canada, so we will see an impact on our tourism sector heading into the summer months.

So before you think of jumping in your car or planning a trip south, I encourage you all to spend your loonies and take your vacations, here at home.

Sheldon Leiba is the President & CEO of Mississauga Board of Trade, Mississauga’s leading business association. Mississauga Board of Trade represents businesses in all industry sectors. Visit www.mbot.com.

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to FurlAdd to Newsvine

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »